Category Archives: Digital Scholarly Editing

Staying True To The Source

As I mentioned in an earlier post, my Digital Scholarly Editing class is working to make a digital scholarly edition of the diary of World War I soldier Albert Woodman. That previous post went into some detail about our TEI … Continue reading

Setting Limits: Knowing When to Stop Encoding

My Digital Scholarly Editing class has been hard at work recently preparing a website featuring the diaries of World War I soldier Albert Woodman. In doing so, we have needed to encode the handwritten diary in a machine-readable format. We … Continue reading

What the Digital Means for the Analogue

In a previous post, I wrote about a trip to the National Archives in Ireland and about some of the data I’d photographed there. And I certainly have had a lot to say about Digital preservation. One thing that the … Continue reading

What Names Can (and Can’t) Tell Us

This past Monday, I went with Shane to the National Archives in Dublin, where we spent some time photographing documents for the Letters of 1916 project.  The project, now in its second year, aims to create a digital archive of … Continue reading