Rebuilding Woodstock – Reflections and the Finished Product!

This is the final blog in a series documenting John Chambers’ and my modelling of Woodstock House, as part of our Modelling Humanities Data Module. Please go to John’s blog here to see more.

Finishing the Project

After what seems like a lot of trial and error, we are finally finished with rebuilding Woodstock. The project itself took a long time, both in terms of trying to create the model itself, but also the sheer amount of knowledge, experience, and practice required when building a model in 3DS Max. As I explained in my previous post, hindsight is a great thing once you learn how to model a few things in 3DS Max. Taking the time to watch relevant material to try to solve a problem is essential to the process, and if you have enough time to do so and effectively practice before creating anything, I would encourage anyone to do so.

Continue reading Rebuilding Woodstock – Reflections and the Finished Product!

Rebuilding Woodstock – Materials, Lighting, and Finishing Construction (AFF-604A)

This is part five in a series documenting John Chambers’ and my modelling of Woodstock House, as part of our Modelling Humanities Data Module. Please go to John’s blog here to see more.

Update on the Project

At this point of the project, we have had our fair share of trials and tribulations with 3DS Max. On the one hand, it’s an extremely powerful piece of software that can build incredible things, however I feel that the amount of time it takes to actually produce a working model requires a lot more time and effort than one can assume going into a project such as this. We’ve constantly been mentioning how we could have done things better in hindsight or joking about how quickly we could model certain aspects if we were to do it again. I think we were right too, but this is more to do with actually practicing and making time to watch tutorial after tutorial after tutorial until you get a technique correct. One thing that surprised me is that myself and John might think of two completely different ways to get the same job done in the software, which I think shows the breadth of creativity that the software can afford someone.

Continue reading Rebuilding Woodstock – Materials, Lighting, and Finishing Construction (AFF-604A)

Rebuilding Woodstock – The Trouble with Windows (AFF-604A)

This is part four in a series documenting John Chambers’ and my modelling of Woodstock House, as part of our Modelling Humanities Data Module. Please go to John’s blog here to see more.

For all of the time and effort that 3DS Max demands with regard to its steep learning curve, there is one element of the entire construction process that has caused the most problems for us in 3DS Max (as well as the most frustration), which has undoubtedly been the construction of windows. Creating the window frames themselves wasn’t too difficult, we were able to model them by creating small boxes and aligning them to suit the photographs. This was done in much the same way as the roofs and chimneys; we first got the desired dimensions and converted the boxes to editable polys. Following this, we drew and connected vertices before deleting selected polygons as required until we had the correct shapes. It was only a matter then of aligning the boxes into the correct shapes.

Continue reading Rebuilding Woodstock – The Trouble with Windows (AFF-604A)

Rebuilding Woodstock – Choosing A Project (AFF-604A)

woodstock4

The Project

As part of our Modelling Humanities Data module, we have been tasked with learning to use 3DS Max with the aim of modelling a place or artefact that no longer exists. My classmate John and I decided early on that, being novices with the software, it would be a good idea to work together as a team to complete the assignment as well as learn the basics of the software. Continue reading Rebuilding Woodstock – Choosing A Project (AFF-604A)

The Power of the Image: Objectivity, Authenticity, and Reconstruction (AFF-622)

This blog post is the third in a series, click here for part 2.

 In my previous two posts from this series, I explored some of the pros and cons of photorealism and non-photorealism. I’ve come to realise that critically thinking about the ‘correct’ application of a visual aesthetic is at once both subjective and objective; it would appear that using photorealistic or NPR techniques in digital heritage is dependant on a plethora of factors, though it usually seems to either come down to the task at hand or purely the desired visual aesthetic of a certain technique relative to that particular task. Continue reading The Power of the Image: Objectivity, Authenticity, and Reconstruction (AFF-622)

Group Assignment Part 4: Finishing the Project & Final Thoughts (AFF-622)

This blog post is the last in a series and will be brief, detailing the concluding stages and thoughts regarding the group assignment. Part 1, Part 2, Part 3.

Having created our 3D models in PhotoScan, we were able to export the OBJ and STL files. Using these, we were able to send the STL files to the library and have our 3D models printed out using a 3D printer. It was very satisfying to see our hard work pay off by having the 3D models available for our presentation and was a nice conclusion to our hard work. Continue reading Group Assignment Part 4: Finishing the Project & Final Thoughts (AFF-622)

Group Assignment Part 3: The Figurines (AFF-622)

This blog is the third in a series, with the first being available here, and the second can be found here.

Technology 3: Photogrammetry 

As mentioned in my first blog in this series, we decided as a group that the best way to accurately capture and record the three figurines was to use the method of Photogrammetry. Photogrammetry is a means by which we can make measurements from photographs and recover the exact positioning of surface points on an object. Using photogrammetry, we were able to create photorealistic 3D models of each of the figurines using Agisoft Photoscan. Similar to the RTI method outlined in my last post, there are two stages to creating each of the models; capturing and post-capture processing. For the team, although this was undoubtedly the most laborious method of recording, the results were impressive. Continue reading Group Assignment Part 3: The Figurines (AFF-622)

Group Assignment Part 2: Recording the Coin, Painting, and Papyrus (AFF-622)

This post is a continuation on a project outlined in my last post, which you can read about here.

Technology 1: RTI Capturing & Processing

The first recording method that we decided to use was Reflection Transmission Imaging (RTI) on the Greek coin, the papyrus, and the abstract painting. The set-up process for capture was relatively easy, with the Canon EOS camera being kept in a fixed position on a tripod directly facing the floor perpendicular to the object. The camera was connected to a laptop with the correct software installed that allowed us to use live capture of images. Continue reading Group Assignment Part 2: Recording the Coin, Painting, and Papyrus (AFF-622)

Group Assignment Part 1: Planning the Project (AFF-622)

The Scenario

As part of our coursework for AFF-622, my colleagues Aveen Holland, John Chambers and I were tasked with a group project that required, in its brief, the “digitisation, analysis and publication of the artefacts recovered after the arrest of [a] man…”. We were given six objects that we had to make digital recordings of based on the skills we had gained throughout the module so far regarding the technologies covered in class. The artefacts that required recording were as follows; Continue reading Group Assignment Part 1: Planning the Project (AFF-622)

A Commentary on the Letters of 1916 Project (AFF-606B)

Within the Digital Humanities, cultural preservation undoubtedly is one of the  focal points of the field. When a piece of history is digitised or recorded and presented to a larger community, it takes on a new role. It becomes a part of a public consciousness in how it is preserved and presented. Continue reading A Commentary on the Letters of 1916 Project (AFF-606B)