Modeling Maynooth Castle Part 2 – Crafting the Walls

tower

In my first blog on modeling Maynooth Castle, I discussed the goal of my final project for AFF621 and a little bit of the background regarding the castle itself.  As I began the process of modeling the castle, I decided the first place to start would be to model the walls, which is what I intend to discuss today.  However, before I get started, I’d like to take a few moments to discuss the planning of the model itself.

A Little Project Planning

Like some graphic design software, such as Adobe Photoshop, 3DS Max requires you to think through how the model is going to be constructed, so that you can be organise your scene.  In order to start this process, I started thinking about what kind of objects would be in my scene, and how I wanted to arrange them.  I came up with the following major items that would need to be a part of the scene:

  • the castle walls
  • the keep
  • the church
  • the gates
  • the living quarters / kitchens / etc.
  • miscellaneous buildings (such as the stables, barn, etc.)
  • the river(s)
  • misceallaneous nature (trees, grass, any other surrounding items, etc.)

Depending on how quickly I am able to execute on the model itself, I may or may not be able to complete everything, so I’ve decided to prioritise the first 5 items with the hope of adding the other objects should I have the bandwidth.

In order to facilitate this process, I decided I would keep each of the above mentioned-sections in their own layers.  This way I could easy turn off entire sections if needed (which could be helpful while fine-tuning other aspects of the scene). Additionally, by grouping them in layers, I can focus on each section at a time—very similar to how I would construct a physical model from legos or other building material(s). With these decisions made, I decided it was time to start the actual modeling process.

Constructing the Walls

I decided to start with the walls for two reasons:

  1. They would form the boundaries of the rest of the inner buildings of the castle itself
  2. They would most likely be the easiest thing to model

I decided to do a quick Google search to begin with just to see if anyone had modeled anything similar in 3DS Max and might therefore have some insight into the process of building walls.  I was lucky enough to happen upon a video that discussed how to construct a castle using 3DS Max.  I watched some of it and decided that it may be useful later, so I’ve filed it away for future use. I also found a script that was created to make the construction of walls easier.  I thought this might be the ideal script to facilitate the creation of walls, so I downloaded it and started using it in my scene.

Unfortunately, the script wasn’t quite what I was looking for.  It’s the kind of script that is great for creating brick walls, but one of the biggest problems I had is that, while it allowed me to set the number of segments for length and height, I couldn’t set the number of segments on the width.  Since I needed to create crenulations along the top of the walls, using this script would have meant manually creating individual crenulations as opposed to using some effects on the wall itself.  I also discovered the script was very computationally intensive and a single wall greatly reduced the processing power of my laptop.  Ultimately, I decided to discard the script and create my own walls from scratch.

I decided to start by creating a box that met the dimensions of the wall I was trying to construct.  I then gave the wall an appropriate number of segments for length, width, and height that would simulate brick work. For example, the south wall is 86.8 metres long, 3.51 metres wide, and 4.96 metres tall. As a result, I gave it 86 length segments, 3 width segments, and 5 height segments which makes each stone roughly 1 metre x 1 metre x 1 metre.  This was an arbitrary decision but one I felt was reasonable.

After drawing out the wall, I converted it to an editable polygon and then used the extrude tool to create crenulations along the top.  I decided each crenulation would be roughly 2 polygons wide and 1 polygon deep, and would be extruded by 1.016 metres.  I then built the remaining 3 walls following the same pattern.  When I was finished, the scene looked as below.  Note: each wall is color coded so I can easily keep track of what wall it is.  The south wall is red; the east wall is yellow; the north wall is green, and the west wall is blue.

Walls_Start

Next, I needed to fit the walls together.  The castle walls themselves do not form a perfect square, but rather bend at some points to create a sort of rounded, circular square.  There are also some breaks in the walls where the walls either protrude or where the walls are broken up by gates or other buildings. I accomplished this in a number of ways: by creating generalised boxes of the appropriate size as placeholders, by cutting up the walls to create the protrusions, and by using soft selection to bend sections of the walls. The outcome can be seen below.

Walls_Connect

As you can see, there was a drastic change in the state of the walls from their first construction.  It’s slowly starting to come together.

Further Struggles

One of the things I’ve struggled with a bit is the application of materials. I have some images of the castle walls themselves. I was hoping to apply them as both a bump map and a diffuse map to create the illusion of stone on the walls.  Unfortunately, it hasn’t worked so well.  Either the images tile too much and look fake, or they blur and, well, look fake.  This will be something I’ll have to work on more later.  I’m sure I’ll blog about it in future posts.

Next Steps

Next, I’m going to focus in on the castle keep and the enclosing walls. Hopefully this will be a little easier than the outer walls, especially now that I’ve picked up a few tips and tricks. More to come later . . .

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