Modeling Maynooth Castle Part 3 – The Keep

mistake

I started modeling the keep a few days ago and felt I was making good progress.  Unfortunately, I was wrong.  However, I’ve learned a very important lesson:  when doing extrusions on an object, always zoom out to make sure you didn’t accidentally destroy the geometry.  Sadly, this lesson cost me about 3 hours’ worth of work.  Thankfully, I started making regular backups of my saves; otherwise this could have been much worse.

The Process

I started the keep with just a standard cube. I then constructed small towers that went along the tops, and for the crenellations, I did what I have always done—I extruded the polygons of the cube (after converting the cube to an editable polygon). I’ve never had a problem with this. Here is what the top part of the keep (which was the area I was focused on) looked like when I noticed my problem.
Top of Keep
I then zoomed out in order to inspect some aspects of the roof of the keep (for which I was about to create the pitched roof). That’s when I noticed my problem.
Messed Up Keep
As you can see from the photo, quite a bit of the geometry of the keep is distorted. Random sections are extruded or missing. The bottom of the keep was completely distorted. I probably could have fixed it, but I decided the amount of work it would have taken me to fix it most likely would have equaled the amount of time I spent getting to that point since my last back up. So I decided to cut my losses and simply revert to my last backup.

What Went Wrong?

I’m not entirely sure where everything went wrong, to be honest. The only thing I can suspect is that I accidentally selected other polygons while I was selecting the polygons for the roof (either that or I had failed to set the height segments when converting to an editable polygon and thus was extruding the entire height of the keep as opposed to one that was supposed to be closer to 1m3.

Lessons Learned

One lesson I’m taking away from this is to always check my line segments before converting to an editable polygon, and another is to frequently check the entire object when making modifications which affect the geometry. But the most important lesson here is to create FREQUENT backups of my scene. Thankfully, this really saved me this time (as I only lost a few hours’ worth of work), so it’s definitely a lesson I have taken (and am continuing to take) to heart.

One thought on “Modeling Maynooth Castle Part 3 – The Keep

Leave a Reply