Modeling Maynooth Castle Part 4 – Materials & Lighting

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Since my last post about Modeling Maynooth Castle, my progress has been solid but largely uneventful.  I haven’t encountered any major issues or problems outside of the normal day to day frustrations of modeling, such as paying extra attention to that one polygon that doesn’t seem to want to be shaped the right way or fixing an accidental extrusion, etc.

After making significant progress on the model itself, I decided to start applying some materials and lighting.  The lighting itself was relatively simple.  Since I’m dealing with a castle that was destroyed in the mid 16th century, I decided I was only going to use natural light.  Thus I was able to easily implement a daylight system.  While I couldn’t quite set the date of the daylight system to 1534 (the year the castle was destroyed), I was able to take it back all the way to 1583, which is the farthest back the software would calculate. I set the time of day as noon and set the appropriate latitude and longitude in order to calculate the position of the sun.  3DS Max made all of this very simplistic, and I had no issues implementing the system.

The materials have proven to be a bit trickier.  I took pictures of the current keep walls, as I hoped to use those as materials.  I pulled one of these pictures into photoshop and used the patch tool to create a seamless, tileable texture.  I think applied this texture as both a bump map and a diffuse map to a material and mapped the material to the keep.  The results are below:

keep_material1

The result isn’t bad, but I don’t feel it’s anywhere near complete. I started experimenting by applying a UVW map.  Then I decided to scrap the original material and create a multi-sub-object material that would allow me to set different materials for different areas (such as the roof, the wood paneling that is part of the roof, etc).  I also decided to create blends and use the images of the castle walls as maps for the blend.  The result ended up with the castle walls themselves looking a little cleaner:

keep_material_multiobj

I think the walls of the castle itself look a little better (ignore the giant cross shape in the middle for now.  Those are actually separate objects I haven’t applied the new material to yet).  However, I don’t think the multi-subobject approach is going to work for the roof:

keep_material1_badroof

 

As you can see, not only does the material not look different (it should have more of a tiled slate look rather than stone) but you can also see each distinct polygon where the material was applied.  I think I’m going to have to trash the roof and rebuild it so it is a separate object that I can apply its own material to.

I’m going to continue working on it to see how I can improve upon it.

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